“Work safely. Go home safely.” 
The National Framers Council develops and implements
best practices to help ensure framers leave the jobsite
each day in the same health as they arrived.

Wall Panels

Framing the American Dream data suggests that installing wall panels completes the task of framing a building’s walls in less time, requires less framer skill and experience and ultimately results in a more reliable building envelope. SBCA, with the help of its members, has developed a wide variety of resources and tools to help component manufacturers design, build and deliver high quality wall panels to their customers. This page draws together the primary and timely resources published on wall panels, click on “more” to view a full search of published items.

Top Resources

This article explores the two different methods used to calculate a wall panel’s capacity to resist applied lateral loads.

The article explores five specific wall panel manufacturing issues that are commonly misunderstood or improperly addresses, including jack and king studs, braced walls, nailing and critical studs.

This article gives an overview of the testing conducted at the SBC Research Institute (SBCRI) to obtain clearly defining braced wall panel design values.

This article provides an in depth analysis of the effects that installation methods and fastener sizes can have on the lateral resistance provided by wood structural panel wall bracing.

This article explores how, through SBCRI testing, it was discovered that design values of OSB in IRC code-compliant shear wall applications are overstated by as much as a factor of 1.8.

Best Practices

This article explores why wall panel designs don’t need to be prepared and sealed by a professional engineer.

This article looks at wall sheathing requirements in the building code and how it applies to manufactured wall panel design.

This document provides an industry-based best practice to general issues involved with delivery, storage, handling and installation of manufactured wall panels.

In order for a building to resist wind and seismic forces, the roof and floor framing must be adequately attached to the braced wall panels to provide a continuous load path.